engineering

CWW: Up and Down

Advertisements
Categories: Architecture, Asia, China, engineering, Photography, Travel, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge: Passing Under the Bridge

Colorful ripples reflect our boat’s passage under and past this remarkable color-and-pattern-changing bridge on the Yangtze River.

Remind you of anything?

Categories: Architecture, Art, Asia, bridges, China, cruises, engineering, Photography, Reflections, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge: The Great Wall of China

img_1051-copy

From a recent trip to China: Climbing the Great Wall. Stamina required

Categories: Architecture, Asia, China, culture, engineering, Photography, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , | 12 Comments

India’s Ancient Magical Observatories

I wanted to climb the steps, but it was not allowed, and a guard stood by to ensure everyone followed the rules. Still, the idea of climbing on the giant edifices tugged at me just as it does a child who steps into an enchanting playground. And that’s what this place looked like—a playground filled with odd-shaped structures that begged to be climbed.

Part of the Jantar Mantar in New Delhi, India

In reality, though, we were at Jantar Mantar—an astronomical observatory built by Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh, a soldier, scholar and ruler with a lifelong interest in math and astronomy. He founded the city of Jaipur in the 1720s and built five Jantar Mantar observatories in northern India.

Jantar Mantar means “instruments for calculation,” or “magical calculations.” The Jaipur observatory consists of 18 devices for measuring time, predicting eclipses, observing planet orbits; calculating the lunar calendar and predicting the start of the monsoon season. It’s main purpose, though, seems to have been casting horoscopes, which require a precise knowledge of the positions of the sun, moon, planets and stars at the moment of birth.

The largest instrument (with steps leading to its top) is a sundial 27 meters high, its shadow carefully plotted to tell the time of day to an accuracy of about two seconds. You can see the shadow moving at 1 millimeter per second, or roughly the width of a hand (6mm) every minute.

Influenced by the Islamic school of astronomy, Jai Singh also incorporated elements of early Greek and Persian observatories into his designs. The Jantar Mantars, however, are more complex, on a greater scale, and contain some completely unique designs and functions.

They were made almost entirely of masonry, with some engraved metal rings and plates set into masonry foundations, and they were built large because the larger the scale, the more accurate the measurements. Once finished, they could not be corrected or improved, and observations were limited to those involving the positions and motions of heavenly bodies that are visible to the naked eye.

Over the years, they’ve been restored from time to time—partly because they are tourist attractions, but also to keep them useful and scientifically authentic. Local astronomers still use them to predict the weather for farmers (although the accuracy is questionable), and students of astronomy and Vedic astrology are required to take some of their lessons at the observatories.

Because of their size and inflexibility, the Jantar Mantars were obsolete even before they were constructed and were soon replaced by smaller machined brass instruments and telescopes that proved more useful and accurate. Still, they are amazing reminders of ancient innovation and man’s quest to understand the universe.

Categories: Architecture, Asia, culture, engineering, History, India, Photography, Stock Photography, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cee’s Fun Photo Challenge: Bridges

Dragon Bridge, Da Nang, Vietnam

Dragon Bridge, Da Nang, Vietnam

Rong Gao (Dragon Bridge), Da Nang, Vietnam. Built in 2013 and designed by U.S. engineers, this dragon breathes fire and hissing smoke (water mist) each weekend after sunset. Now that I’ve photographed it during the day, returning at night is on my Bucket List.

Categories: Architecture, Asia, bridges, culture, Da Nang, dragons, engineering, Photography, Travel, Vietnam | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.

Norm 2.0

Photography, fiction, humor, opinions, and whatever else I feel like posting

gadflyonthewallblog

"To sting people and whip them into a fury, all in the service of truth."

10 Cities/10 Years

the road is life

on the road with Animalcouriers

pet transport through Europe and beyond

The Abject Muse

Embracing the Absurd Since 2011

Captured by Aishwarya

Thoughts captured by my pen, images captured by my cam

Recipe in a Bottle

Connecting to Friends, Old and New, Through Recipes, Gardens, and Dinner Parties

Life in Minutes

Living in the moment

GINGERSHOUTS

Set your thoughts free

Netdancer's Musings

Live Life Passionately

China Icons - Your guide to life, work and travel in China

Natural wonders, jaw-dropping engineering, delicious food, bustling cities, ancient temples, glamorous fashionistas, visionary thinkers. This is the site to meet China's icons - past, present and still to come

%d bloggers like this: